Architecture for London has received planning consent at appeal for a Greenwich house. This project is a new build property in south east London for a site that had many challenges, including a very narrow width. It is located in a conservation area and a previous owner had been refused planning consent for a house on the site.

AFL advised our client to apply for a two storey house, with ground floor and basement levels only. This design had little impact on the street, as the house would be no taller than a garden wall. This approach informed the architectural concept for the house: that it would be read as a garden wall from the street. All external elevations are therefore in London stock brick, without openings, and all windows are internal facing onto a landscaped courtyard. Parking is provided on site to remove any impact on street parking in the area.

The house takes an inverted form, with living rooms on the upper level and all bedrooms in the basement. This approach makes best use of the natural light available at ground floor and the views to the courtyard.

The surrounding Charlton Village conservation area primarily features Victorian brick terraces and in particular, smaller worker’s cottages. The area began to grow rapidly in the late 19th Century, expanding from the original medieval village. Large-scale expansion, joining Charlton up with Woolwich in the east and Greenwich in the west, came around the turn of the century.

Project architect: Tom Dawson

Location: Charlton Road, Greenwich SE3

Visit the Architecture for London residential projects page to view our completed private homes in east London.